Journal

Journal

Four Ways / Understand the Universe

Our third ‘way’ is in many respects the night time or flipside to ‘Observe to Orientate’, and here we take a broader look at the firmament above us and consider how we relate to this abode of the Gods, paying close attention to the primary constellations, the Milky Way and other major star groups.

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Four Ways / Observe to Orientate

Greetings on the Winter Solstice. In our second ‘way’ we explore the importance of understanding our position on the surface of the Earth. Using the primary compass points, the major solar stations of the Sun and the pole star, as we harness our general sense of bearing and orientation within the wider landscape.

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Fours Ways / Form & Feeling

What is it about certain places in the landscape, that once we’ve been there, they resonate so strongly within us, that even after we’ve left, it can still feel like a part of us is still there, left behind? What enlivens and animates this space, and how does our role as intentional observer within a relational field define us as a foci of power?

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Digging Deeper

With the release of the Netflix film ‘The Dig’ later this month, we are reminded just how much our understanding has evolved since Basil Brown’s excavations in 1939 led to the discovery of Sutton Hoo. We now know that the landscape around Sutton Hoo was an open one, with the mounds standing uninterrupted for more than seven kilometres to the East.

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The Sun Burns Brightest

Tomorrow marks the astronomical summer solstice, the day when the sun burns brightest. Whilst we may be familiar with the idea of the summer solstice being celebrated because it is the longest day, evidence indicates that its celebration formed part of a complex interaction of astronomy, society and ritual – it was far more than simply a mechanism that acted as a farmers calendar.

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Exploring Cumberland’s Mount and the Nine Yard Oak

Well amongst the most trying of times, this covid-era lockdown is bringing some shards of light. With our once a day walk in the woods and fields there’s plenty of time to research and reflect.

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In search of Polsborough Gate

During the years of 1732 to 1734, John Kirby, a Suffolk land surveyor and topographer, journeyed throughout the County of Suffolk surveying the roads and recording the details which he subsequently published in 1735 as a book titled The Suffolk Traveller: or, Journey through Suffolk.

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2020 – In the forests and furrows

On the eve of a new orbit around our Sun, we look forward to greeting 2020 with you. We’d like to thank you for your support and signpost some of the wonderful hidden mysteries in our landscape that we will be endeavouring to explore and investigate in the year ahead.

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The Dark Hours of Midwinter

Tomorrow is the astronomical Winter Solstice, an auspicious liminal moment in time. The long daylight hours of midsummer, a time for human activities enjoying life and holidays are remembered.

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The Lost Features of the Leiston Landscape

The references to Leiston Harrow, the Procession Rayles and Leiston Gallows all appear in a survey conducted on the 24th April 1620 when a perambulation of the boundary of the manor was conducted by a court under the supervision of the Right Noble George, Marquis of Bucks.

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